Category Archives: SIGUCCS Commuity

#SheIsWhyICode Women’s History Month – Evelyn Boyd Granville

Evelyn Boyd Granville (1924 – present)

Evelyn Granville Ph.D

Evelyn became only the second black woman to hold a PhD in Mathematics, graduating from Yale University in 1949. She was responsible for developing computer software that examined satellites for the Mercury space programs. She later conducted research on calculating orbits for the Computation and Data Reduction Center of Space Technology Laboratories and on the Apollo Project for NASA. She remains a strong advocate for women’s education in technology.

During Women’s History Month this March, ACM is encouraging computing professionals and students to use the hashtag #SheIsWhyICode to share stories of women in computing who have inspired them at any point in their career or education. The stories might range in topic from one’s earliest introduction to computer science to overcoming a recent professional obstacle, and the subjects could vary from luminaries of the computing field to someone’s high school computer science teacher or current boss.

#SheIsWhyICode Women’s History Month – Jean Bartik

Jean Bartik (1924 – 2011)

jean bartik

Jean Bartik is credited with developing the technology known as “software”. She was a mathematics major who worked at the Aberdeen Proving Ground after graduation and was tasked with manually calculating ballistics trajectories. While working there, she was one of the first groups of women programmers (a total of six were selected) selected for ENIAC (Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer). This group developed a program for calculating the firing of trajectories for artillery shells. She and Betty Holberton (https://siguccs.org/wp/celebrating-women-in-computing-frances-elizabeth-holberton-sheiswhyicode/) are credited with providing the first hugely successful demonstration of the ENIAC to the public and larger scientific community in 1946. Her major accomplishment however was converting the ENIAC into a stored computer program – software.

During Women’s History Month this March, ACM is encouraging computing professionals and students to use the hashtag #SheIsWhyICode to share stories of women in computing who have inspired them at any point in their career or education. The stories might range in topic from one’s earliest introduction to computer science to overcoming a recent professional obstacle, and the subjects could vary from luminaries of the computing field to someone’s high school computer science teacher or current boss.

#SheIsWhyICode Women’s History Month – Frances Allen

Frances E Allen (1932 – present)

Allen mg 2528-3750K-b.jpg

In 2006, Frances became the first woman to receive ACM’s Turing Award. She was also the first female IBM Fellow. She joined IBM in 1957 after working as a teacher and earning her master’s degree in mathematics. She planned to return to teaching once her student loans were paid off, but ended up staying with IBM for her entire 45 year career.  She is known for leading developments in the field of optimizing compilers. She is recognized for her accomplishments in development of compilers, parallelization and code optimization. She also played a role in intelligence work on programming languages as well as security codes for The National Security Agency (NSA).

For more information, visit https://amturing.acm.org/award_winners/allen_1012327.cfm

During Women’s History Month this March, ACM is encouraging computing professionals and students to use the hashtag #SheIsWhyICode to share stories of women in computing who have inspired them at any point in their career or education. The stories might range in topic from one’s earliest introduction to computer science to overcoming a recent professional obstacle, and the subjects could vary from luminaries of the computing field to someone’s high school computer science teacher or current boss.

#SheIsWhyICode Women’s History Month – Barbara Simons

Barbara Simons (1941 – present)

Barbara Simons at a lectern

The 2020 Women’s History Month theme is “Valiant Women of the Vote”, and in this article, we celebrate Barbara Simons, a retired computer scientist who believes that paper is the only safe voting technology. She began her career at IBM in their research division and worked on compiler optimizer, algorithm analysis, and clock synchronization. After 17 years there, she became president of the Association for Computing Machinery. She served as president of ACM for 9 years and focused on policy associated with technology regulations. After leaving ACM, she began working on voting technology policy, specifically the dangers of unverified voting via technology.

Learn more: https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2017/12/guardian-of-the-vote/544155/

During Women’s History Month this March, ACM is encouraging computing professionals and students to use the hashtag #SheIsWhyICode to share stories of women in computing who have inspired them at any point in their career or education. The stories might range in topic from one’s earliest introduction to computer science to overcoming a recent professional obstacle, and the subjects could vary from luminaries of the computing field to someone’s high school computer science teacher or current boss.

Local SIGUCCS Chapters — the NYCHES Story

Did you know that New York State has a local chapter of SIGUCCS? Or that you could start your own local chapter? For information on ACM SIG local chapters, see https://www.acm.org/chapters/professionals/how-to-start-a-professional-sig-chapter

NYCHES (New York Computing in Higher Education Symposium – nyches.acm.org) was formally established in 1997 based on efforts of IT professionals from Syracuse University and Cornell University.  

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Celebrating Women in Computing – Frances Elizabeth Holberton #SheIsWhyICode

Frances Elizabeth Holberton (1917 – 2001)

During World War II, Betty was hired as a “computor” – women that were hired to manually compute ballistic trajectories for the Army. These manual calculations were complex and took 30 hours to solve. But in 1945, the Army built a machine to replicate the work and Betty was part of the team of six women commissioned to program the ENIAC machine. All six women earned a place in the Women in Technology International Hall of Fame.

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Celebrating Women in Computing – Sister Mary Kenneth Keller #SheIsWhyICode

Sister Mary Kenneth Keller (1913-1985)

An American Roman Catholic nun, she was the first woman to earn a PhD in computer science (1965, University of Wisconsin-Madison) in the United States. During her graduate studies, she worked with the National Science foundation workshop in Computer Science at Dartmouth College (all male at the time) and participated in the implementation of the BASIC programming language. She later went on to found the computer science department at Clarke College (now University) and directed the department for twenty years.

note sheet
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Celebrating Women in Computing – Grace Hopper #SheIsWhyICode

Grace Hopper (1906 – 1992)

Known for creating COBOL, the first programming language, Grace Hopper is referred to as a pioneer computer scientist. After earning a PhD in mathematics from Yale and teaching at Vassar College, Grace Hopper joined the Navy Reserves during World War II. There she began working on the Harvard Mark 1 computing team.

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Celebrating Women in Computing – Ada Lovelace #SheIsWhyICode

Ada Lovelace (1815-1852)

As the daughter of poet Lord Byron, her mother wanted to make sure that she did not have her father’s artistic temperament and insured that she was taught sciences and math as a young girl. Her work brought her into collaboration with Charles Babbage, “father of computers” where she was asked to translate an Italian article about a military machine – the Analytical Engine.

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