Category Archives: Takeaway

SIGUCCS 2019 Conference Takeaway – Campus Experience for Online Classes

Bringing Campus Experience to Online Classes

Key problems in making the online experience “equivalent” to campus experience were the ability to have real time meetings, a good recording/streaming platform, and how to handle labs and specialty software. University of Oregon discussed the solutions that they implemented to support these three issues and how the platforms that they implemented provided a solution that satisfied their students and faculty.

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SIGUCCS 2019 Conference Takeaway – Accessibility

An A11yance: Approaches for Transferring Expertise to Build Accessibility Liaisons in the Campus Community

Rutgers University and Princeton University presented on their individual approaches to building accessibility awareness and expertise across their campuses.

Princeton University has a program in place to allow members of the university to get CPACC certified. These people become local experts to assist with accessibility questions within their departments. As part of this certification, they have a study group for people working on the certification class together. This includes quizzes and lunch and learn sessions.

Rutgers University uses a series of in-house training classes to educate staff within departments to become their accessibility liaisons. Additional resources are available through online offerings.

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SIGUCCS 2019 Conference Takeaway – Applying Design Thinking

Applying Design Thinking: Panel

How familiar are you with Design Thinking? Were you aware of the 5 steps (Empathize, Define, Ideate, Prototype, and Test)? Did you know you could apply design thinking to IT support? The team from Texas Woman’s University provided an overview of how they used problem solving and empathy to get to the heart of what their customers were needing.

Texas Woman's University Team
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SIGUCCS 2019 Conference Takeaway – Catch the Big Bad Wolf

Catch the Big Bad Wolf: A Cybersecurity-themed Escape Room

Ok, this was not a presentation, but an experience. Attendance was limited due to a limited number of escape room kits. After a short introduction, attendees had to solve a puzzle while learning about cybersecurity.

The good news is that this escape room kit is available for use by anyone. It was originally created by Grinnell College and University of Nebraska. Indiana University customized it to meet their needs and be focused on their educational materials.

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SIGUCCS 2018 Conference Takeaway – What Cats can teach us about Excellent Customer Service

What Cats can teach us about Excellent Customer Service

Presented by: Miranda Carney-Morris, Julio Appling, and Elizabeth Young (Lewis and Clark College)

An interactive workshop where various archetypes of cats were explained and how they related to typical support user types. A participant activity followed in which attendees creatively devised solutions to herd (and best support) these types of cats/customers.

Cats and Customer Service Panelists

Read the paper in the ACM Digital Library

Review the slides in Sched 

Takeaways:

Customer types are diverse as cat breeds. Providing flexible and effective support is an art! Meow, meow, meow!

SIGUCCS 2018 Conference Takeaway – A Career in Organized Anarchy

A Career in Organized Anarchy: Building Interpersonal Relationships in Higher Education

Presented by: Matthew House (Washington University in St Louis)

Understanding the university as an organization can help you build relationships with others on your campus. Relationships can help foster trust and engagement, gain commitment and backing, and help you get timely and accurate information.

There are four different models of higher education institution; knowing the type of institution that you work at can help you build those relationships. The four models are: collegial, bureaucratic, political, and anarchical. Also, know your institution’s Carnegie classification. This can help you navigate the rough waters of relationship building.

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SIGUCCS 2018 Conference Takeaway – Investing in your Training Portfolio: diversifying Training Methods

Investing in your Training Portfolio: diversifying Training Methods

Presented by: Winnie Ling Luper, William Olsen (Rutgers University))

Winnie Ling LuperIn this presentation, Winnie and William covered their entire student training program in depth and talked about how they used slido.com for the presentation. This session covered their student evaluation, feedback and improvement process.

Student training included some cool gamification ideas. Student leaders were tasked with coming up with gaming themes for training. Some examples include Consultant Ninja Warrior, Who wants to be a Consultant, and The ARC Amazing Race. Training also includes a number of hands-on activities, like building a computer and raspberry pi. They seem to have a great training program with a very small teacher to student ratio (no more than 7 students per class).

This session also covered their consultant review process. Each student supervisor has 7 consultants.

Read the paper on the ACM Digital Library

Review the slides on Sched

Takeaways:

Exciting perspective on training student employees with many examples that could be used by anyone even smaller schools. – Tim Foley

SIGUCCS 2018 Conference Takeaway – Navigating your Path to Leadership

Navigating your Path to Leadership

Presented by: David Weil (Ithaca College), Beth Rugg (University of North Carolina, Charlotte), Terry Ruger (Ithaca College)

What a phenomenal group of presenters who shared with us how to prepare for advancing up the career ladder. They reminded us that advancing up that ladder is about people and vision and less about technology. Mid-level management is not about being better at technology.

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SIGUCCS 2018 Conference Takeaway – Anatomy of a Career Coaching Session

Anatomy of a Career Coaching Session

Presented by: Diana Sadlouskos (Sadlouskos Consulting)

Diane Anatomy of a Career Coaching SessionDiana Sadlouskos, a career coach, provided us an inside look at a career coaching session by showcasing her process with a SIGUCCS attendee. Some of her advice included:

  • Identify the job(s) that you are interested in
  • Update your application materials to apply specifically to that job
    • Cover letter
    • Resume
  • Prepare for interviews
    • Create an interview prep document/matrix
    • Develop a career notebook
    • Create your 2-3 minute introduction
  • Plan for your next steps

Review the slides on Sched

Takeaways:

Your resume should be built upon the themes of the job for which you are applying. Highlight the skills that are being requested in that new position. Be sure that your resume and cover letter tell your story and tell it well. – Lisa Brown

What a fantastic opportunity to see what happens in career coaching sessions. I learned that each time you apply for a job, your application materials must be recreated to apply toward the credentials sought. – Laurie Fox

SIGUCCS 2018 Conference Takeaway – The “I” in Team

The “I” in Team: How developing individual strength builds a great team

Presented by: Tom Wilk (Carnegie Mellon University)
Tom Wilk

Managers face three types of employees on their teams: struggler, “average Joe”, and rock star. Each type requires a different management strategy. Managers need to set SMART goals and document progress as part of performance management (don’t just tell them to do better). Tom uses 1-1 meetings with agendas, performance appraisals, coaching, shared documents, and other tools to assist him in building a team.

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